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Deleting Your Livejournal: You Don't Have To Set Yourself On Fire On Your Way Out Of The Building - Morgan Dawn Livejournal:The Here And Now
The Here And Now
morgandawn
morgandawn
Deleting Your Livejournal: You Don't Have To Set Yourself On Fire On Your Way Out Of The Building
I've seen people reblogging a post that  (1) LJ servers are now being housed in Russia and (2) "the Russian government now has access to private information on private citizens across the country, their interests, their views, their families" and (3) and recommending that fans delete their LJ blogs and communities. If you do reblog/post please let people know they don't have to delete wholesale - they can import their blogs and communities to Dreamwidth. I've seen too many people anguishing over the loss of their creations, the comments and feedback, and their fandom history etc because they do not know they have choices. So if you're going to pass along a message of "FIRE!!!" , please point them towards the exits safely.

Dreamwidth FAQ:
https://www.dreamwidth.org/support/faqbrowse?faqid=127 (importing personal blogs)
https://www.dreamwidth.org/support/faqbrowse?faqid=230 (importing communities)

edited: As of 12/27/2016 only the Cyrillic/Russian accounts seem to have been relocated to Russian. No ETA on when/if the rest of the world will be moved, but you may still want to backup your personal blog or community nonetheless.
http://siderea.livejournal.com/1330106.html
http://siderea.livejournal.com/1330197.html

Here are Russian language posts about the Russian journals that have been blocked  and speculation about what is happening (use Google Translate):
http://dolboeb.livejournal.com/3079690.html
http://dolboeb.livejournal.com/3081385.html

edited: I ran my LJ through http://ping.eu/traceroute/ and it seems to point to Russia. I don't  know enough about how the Internets work to validate. BOTTOM LINE: BACKUP YOUR LJS

edited 12/302016: LJ pages are no longer secure (payment pages are still secure).

Also, if you do backup to Dreamwidth, please consider buying a paid account.
[A Dreamwidth post with comment count unavailable comments | Post or read on Dreamwidth| How to use OpenID]

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Comments
kassidy62 From: kassidy62 Date: December 30th, 2016 05:41 am (UTC) (Link)
thanks for this--I haven't checked closely, but dreamwidth appears to have imported both my personal LJ and an Alias Smith & Jones comm I own tonight.
morgandawn From: morgandawn Date: December 30th, 2016 12:14 pm (UTC) (Link)
If there have been any new comments or entries at the LJ blogs/comms, you may need to rerun the DWimport tool. The import is one time only and needs to be manually updated from time to time.
fiorenza_a From: fiorenza_a Date: January 2nd, 2017 08:58 am (UTC) (Link)

I don't run a comm, so not worried from that perspective - and nothing I've written is so Earth shattering that the world couldn't live without it - so from a personal perspective this doesn't worry me either.

But censorship in general does worry me. I don't believe in an unfettered right to post. People sometimes post hateful things.

But some things are not hateful, they are simply uncomfortable and distasteful and such things are the price of freedom. Which is not a support of trolling activities - but you should have a right to post your dislike of gay freedoms, or feminism or your support for corporal punishment.

And a distaste for your Government is another thing you should be able to post.

I see no reason to object to Russia having my details any more than I object to the USA having them. The internet is not a private space - it's a public one. If you want private communication, write a letter. And why should I find the internet conglomerates and Trump any more trustworthy than Putin?

But I do object to censorship. I shall monitor this situation - I don't want to be part of a community that tolerates censorship. If Lj becomes somewhere that does not recognise the right of legitimate protest, then it will not be somewhere for me.

I shall therefore keep hold of the import link you kindly supplied.

My trifling fannish posts are irrelevant, but other Lj users are hosting much more serious real world discussions. And they should be allowed to do that. I can't turn a blind eye if it transpires that they're not.
morgandawn From: morgandawn Date: January 2nd, 2017 01:10 pm (UTC) (Link)
What's new about LJ is that they've turned off secured browsing (HTTPS ) so when you log into your account, your password can be seen by anyone monitoring the site and anyone else long the way (in transit). The payment page still seems to e encrypted (for now). The lack of HTTPS security also means anything you post under lock is also accessible and your personal identity can be stolen

In the end my advice: make a new password just for LJ, do not pay anything through them and realize that anything you post or read there there can be intercepted by others

http://mashable.com/2011/05/31/https-web-security/#bVkObrMWb5qf

"There’s an important distinction between tweeting to the world or sharing thoughts on Facebook and having your browsing activity going over unencrypted HTTP. You intentionally share tweets, likes, pics and thoughts. The lack of encryption means you’re unintentionally exposing the controls necessary to share such things. It’s the difference between someone viewing your profile and taking control of your keyboard.....

...If my linguistic metaphors have left you with no understanding of the technical steps to execute sniffing attacks, you can quite easily execute these attacks with readily-available tools. A recent one is a plugin you can add to your Firefox browser. The plugin, called Firesheep, enables mouse-click hacking for sites like Amazon, Facebook, Twitter and others. The creation of the plugin demonstrates that technical attacks can be put into the hands of anyone who wishes to be mischievous, unethical, or malicious.

To be clear, sniffing attacks don’t need to grab your password in order to impersonate you. Web apps that use HTTPS for authentication protect your password. If they use regular HTTP after you log in, they’re not protecting your privacy or your temporary identity"




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